Mt. Vernon Register-News

CNHI Special Projects

February 25, 2013

Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil, nuts slashes heart risk

MINNEAPOLIS — A Mediterranean diet with extra servings of olive oil or mixed nuts reduced the risk of a first heart attack, stroke and death by almost 30 percent in less than five years, according to a study from Spanish researchers.

The research involved 7,477 high-risk volunteers, all of whom were diabetic or had a host of risk factors including obesity, high cholesterol, family history of heart disease or smoking. Heart damage was significantly more likely to occur in people told to watch their fat intake than in those given olive oil or nuts and told to follow a Mediterranean diet, according to the study in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study was halted after the benefits of the diet became clear, the researchers said.

The findings add more weight to the benefits of a Mediterranean diet rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and oils, the researchers said. While numerous studies show healthy eating can cut complications in people who already have heart disease and help ward off ailments including Alzheimer's disease and diabetes, the study is the first to show a diet can prevent deadly heart disease from developing.

"These results support the benefits of the Mediterranean diet for cardiovascular risk reduction," said the researchers led by Ramon Estruch from the University of Barcelona. "They are particularly relevant given the challenges of achieving and maintaining weight loss," they said. "The results of our trial might explain, in part, the lower cardiovascular mortality in Mediterranean countries than in northern European countries or the United States."

In the study, 3.4 percent of those on a Mediterranean diet who were given extra nuts experienced a heart attack, stroke or died from cardiac complications, compared with 3.8 percent on a Mediterranean diet plus extra olive oil and 4.4 percent of those asked to follow a low-fat diet. No one was told to curtail their calories or assigned an exercise program.

Text Only
CNHI Special Projects
  • Screen Shot 2014-07-31 at 2.12.55 PM.png VIDEO: Five-year-old doesn't want her brother to grow up

    Sadie, an adorable 5-year-old from Phoenix, wants her brother to stay young forever, so much so that her emotional reaction to the thought of him getting older has drawn more than 10 million views on YouTube.

    July 31, 2014 1 Photo

  • lockport-police.jpg Police department turns to Facebook for guidance on use of 'negro'

    What seems to be a data entry mistake by a small town police department in western New York has turned into a social media firestorm centered around the word "negro" and whether it's acceptable to use in modern society.

    July 31, 2014 3 Photos

  • The virtues of lying

    Two computational scientists set out recently to simulate the effects of lying in a virtual human population. Their results, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, show that lying is essential for the growth of a cohesive social network.

    July 31, 2014

  • Survey results in legislation to battle sexual assault on campus

    Missouri U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill joined a bipartisan group of senators Wednesday to announce legislation that aims to reduce the number of sexual assaults on college campuses.

    July 30, 2014

  • An alarming threat to airlines that no one's talking about

    It's been an abysmal year for the flying public. Planes have crashed in bad weather, disappeared over the Indian Ocean and tragically crossed paths with anti-aircraft missiles over Ukraine.

    July 30, 2014

  • linda-ronstadt.jpg Obama had crush on First Lady of Rock

    Linda Ronstadt remained composed as she walked up to claim her National Medal of Arts at a White House ceremony Monday afternoon.

    July 29, 2014 1 Photo

  • Can black women have it all?

    In a powerful new essay for the National Journal, my friend Michel Martin makes a compelling case for why we need to continue the having-it-all conversation.

    July 29, 2014

  • Dangerous Darkies Logo.png Redskins not the only nickname to cause a stir

    Daniel Snyder has come under fire for refusing to change the mascot of his NFL team, the Washington Redskins. The Redskins, however, are far from being the only controversial mascot in sports history.  Here is a sampling of athletic teams from all areas of the sports world that were outside the norm.

    July 28, 2014 3 Photos

  • 'Rebel' mascot rising from the dead

    Students and alumni from a Richmond, Va.-area high school are seeking to revive the school's historic mascot, a Confederate soldier known as the "Rebel Man," spurring debate about the appropriateness of public school connections to the Civil War and its icons.

    July 28, 2014

  • Fast food comes to standstill in China

    The shortage of meat is the result of China's latest food scandal, in which a Shanghai supplier allegedly tackled the problem of expired meat by putting it in new packaging and shipping it to fast-food restaurants around the country

    July 28, 2014

Twitter Updates
Facebook
Stocks