Mt. Vernon Register-News

Community News Network

June 17, 2013

When trust in Uncle Sam takes a beating, workers are bruised

(Continued)

WASHINGTON —

William Brown, president of the African American Federal Executives Association: "The public is left to judge our federal operations based on a limited number of controversial activities. This negatively impacts the thousands of dedicated federal workers who perform to the highest professional standards in the world. . . . If we do not wake up and celebrate and reward our successes, we run the risk of creating a dysfunctional government."

William Dougan, president of the National Federation of Federal Employees: "There's no doubt that stories like these sow mistrust in government in general, and some of that can spill over to rank-and-file federal workers.

"That said, no one is likely to turn away their postman anytime soon," Dougan said.

Speaking of mail carriers, Sally Davidow, spokesperson for the American Postal Workers Union, said: "The recent stories don't seem to be having a negative effect on postal employees. In fact, our members take pride in protecting the privacy of America's mail. Postal workers are demoralized by Congress's continuing failure to take action to protect this vital American institution."

Carol Bonsaro, president of the Senior Executives Association: "I have little doubt that the public's perception has already been affected negatively. The public holds a low opinion of Congress and government generally, but now career employees have a big target on their backs."

Dan Blair, president and chief executive of the National Academy of Public Administration: "In order to regain the public's trust and encourage our best and brightest to engage in public service, [everyone from] agency heads to line employees must be held accountable.

"That includes more leadership attention to managing operations and ensuring prompt and fair action against those whose actions poison the well of public trust."

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