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February 28, 2013

First lady announces effort to help kids exercise

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Research shows that daily exercise has a positive influence on academic performance, but kids today spend too much time sitting, mostly in school but also outside the classroom while watching TV, playing video games or surfing the Internet. Federal guidelines recommend that children ages 6-17 get at least 60 minutes of exercise daily, which can be racked up through multiple spurts of activity throughout the day.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan said he's proof of the link between exercise and academic performance. As a boy, he said he had a hard time sitting still in class but that exercise helped him focus.

"What's true for me is true for many of our nation's children," he said in an interview.

Duncan, who played basketball professionally in Australia for several years, said the choice is not between physical activity or academics, especially with about one-third of U.S. kids either overweight or obese and at higher risk for life-threatening illnesses like heart disease or diabetes.

"It's got to be both," he said. Duncan cited the examples of students learning the alphabet while dancing or memorizing multiplication tables while doing jumping jacks.

Under the new "Let's Move" initiative, modest grants will be available from the Education Department to help some programs get started.

Mrs. Obama called on school staff, families and communities to help get 50,000 schools involved in the program over the next five years.

The President's Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition, the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, and the Alliance for a Healthier Generation will oversee the program. Funding and other resources will come from Nike Inc., the GENYOUth Foundation, ChildObesity180, Kaiser Permanente and the General Mills Foundation.

Nike has committed $50 million to the effort over the next five years; the remaining groups together have pledged more than $20 million.

"All kids deserve a chance to realize their full potential and we believe creating active schools will help kids do better in school and most importantly in life," said Nike President and CEO Mark Parker.

 

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