Mt. Vernon Register-News

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December 25, 2013

Fitness experts decry ‘resolution dependency’

One of the country’s best-known fitness center chains is launching an initiative to wean people from what it calls an over-dependence on New Year’s resolutions.

Irving, Texas-based Gold’s Gym announced a seven-step “anti-resolution” plan this month designed in part to “break the endless cycle of weight loss resolutions and give consumers a better road map to success — one that results in healthy, lasting change,” according to a release from the company.

"Diets don't work,” said Robert Reams, a member of Gold’s Gym Fitness Institute. “Instead, you must look at the choices you make on a daily basis in the areas of nutrition, exercise, sleep and stress management and make a sustainable plan to change your ways.

"If you do this right you'll only have to do it once and you'll never have to re-visit this concept again,” he added.

The company’s seven-step “anti-resolution action plan” includes:

  • Establish short, obtainable goals – "The problem with resolutions is that the minute people falter, or slip on their resolution, they quit, throwing all their progress out the window," said Mike Ryan, Gold's Gym Fitness Institute Expert and celebrity personal trainer. "Create a short, obtainable goal for yourself, and when you achieve your first goal, you're more likely to set another and stick with it."
  • Schedule the gym the same way you would schedule a doctor’s appointment – "The minute you say ‘I don't' have time,’ you avoid holding yourself accountable for a trip to the gym, making you more likely to skip the gym the next time around as well," said Adam Friedman, Gold's Gym Fitness Institute Expert and celebrity personal trainer.
  • Realize that fitness is only part of the plan – "In order to achieve peak metabolism, supplement your workouts with a diet made up of real, whole food," Reames said. "Minimize, if not avoid altogether, processed meals and food items. We truly are what we eat. Food is the fuel that runs your engine, so do not compromise."
  • Find healthy habits you actually enjoy – "To make a lasting change in your life, you need to establish habits that you can enjoy,” said Robert Irvine, Gold's Gym Fitness Institute Expert and celebrity chef. “An easy way to do this is to include family and friends in what you do. Include your kids when cooking a meal at home – it's healthier and a great way to spend time with family."
  • Switch it up – "If you feel yourself getting bored with your workout routine, think about making it fresh again,” said fitness trainer Ramona Braganza. “Switch it up by trying a group exercise class, or working out with a friend.”
  • Introduce "It's time for bed" to your vocabulary – "The hours before midnight are almost twice as valuable as the hours after midnight for health.  After all, physical change occurs exclusively during sleep," said Eric the Trainer, Gold's Gym Fitness Institute Expert and celebrity personal trainer.
  • Anticipate obstacles – "There really is no such thing as a ‘perfect plan,’” said fitness model Jamie Eason. “Life is unpredictable and the best we can do is to anticipate obstacles and create strategies for coping with them.” said Gold's Gym Fitness Institute Expert and fitness model Jamie Eason.

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